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Explore The Historic Marysville

The history

The tale of Marysville unfolds alongside the narrative of the Drumlummon Mine—from its 1875 claim by Irish immigrant Thomas Cruise to the zenith of nearly 5,000 residents at the turn of the century. During this era, Marysville thrived with two railroads, a steam-powered electrical system, three newspapers, saloons, an opera house, churches, general stores, restaurants, and boarding houses.

Following the closure of Drumlummon, most mining families sought new opportunities, leaving Marysville with a few enduring old-timers and transforming it into a bedroom community for Helena. Today, Marysville preserves its rich history and serves as a hub for outdoor enthusiasts, offering activities like skiing and hiking that breathe life into this remarkable and historic small town.

#1

Marysville Museum & Gallery

Marysville Museum & Gallery is dedicated to the restoration and maintenance of historic buildings, preservation of of artifacts and local stories, and promoting awareness of local history.

The museum is free to the public, and is open Saturday & Sunday, June – September. Tours are available year round (weather permitting), email to inquire about reservations and fees.
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information on upcoming events.

Open seasonally June-Sept. 12pm -4pm Saturday and Sunday, or by email request.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#2

Marysville schoolhouse

Originally constructed in 1883 as a two-room structure, the Marysville schoolhouse underwent a rapid expansion in 1891 with the addition of a second story to accommodate over 200 students spanning eleven grades, overseen by as many as nine teachers.

Today, the school is under the care of the Marysville Pioneer Association, functioning as both a museum and a town meeting hall.

Notably, in 1957, through the generosity and efforts of Brian O’Connell, the second story was removed, restoring the schoolhouse to its original form.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#3

our lady of lourdes catholic church

Constructed in the year 1886, the church stood as a spiritual beacon for the community, steadfastly serving its congregation until the 1940s. In its latter years of operation, dedicated clergy, namely Father Lambertus and Father Gilmore, traversed from East Helena to deliver essential services to the faithful. Simultaneously, Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, established in the same monumental year of 1886, enriched the spiritual tapestry of the area.

It’s noteworthy that Thomas Cruse, a pivotal figure in the local community and a benefactor of the Drumlummon Mine fortune, demonstrated his commitment to religious development. Notably, he directed a portion of his wealth towards the construction of the grand Cathedral of St. Helena in Helena, MT, further solidifying the enduring legacy of faith and community in the region.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#4

marysville’s oldest structure

Nestled within the heart of Marysville, the hand-hewn log structure standing proudly is said to be the town’s oldest building, bearing witness to the passage of time and preserving the echoes of its storied past. This historical gem once belonged to none other than Dr. Landstrum, one of Marysville’s earliest physicians, who likely contributed significantly to the burgeoning community’s well-being.

Just a stone’s throw to the south of this venerable structure, traces of the Northern Pacific Railroad bed are etched into the landscape, marking the path where the railroad crossed the trestle and made its entry into the town. As you explore the surroundings, you’ll find tangible reminders of Marysville’s rich history, connecting you to the bygone era when the railroad played a pivotal role in shaping the town’s growth and prosperity.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#5

boarding house

Nestled within the heart of Marysville, the hand-hewn log structure standing proudly is said to be the town’s oldest building, bearing witness to the passage of time and preserving the echoes of its storied past. This historical gem once belonged to none other than Dr. Landstrum, one of Marysville’s earliest physicians, who likely contributed significantly to the burgeoning community’s well-being.

Just a stone’s throw to the south of this venerable structure, traces of the Northern Pacific Railroad bed are etched into the landscape, marking the path where the railroad crossed the trestle and made its entry into the town. As you explore the surroundings, you’ll find tangible reminders of Marysville’s rich history, connecting you to the bygone era when the railroad played a pivotal role in shaping the town’s growth and prosperity.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#6

Methodist Church

Constructed in the year 1886, the Marysville Methodist Church served as a spiritual cornerstone for the community until its last use in 1939, marking an era of significant historical and cultural significance. In a testament to its enduring legacy, the building found new life when it was acquired and meticulously restored by the dedicated efforts of John and Margaret Hollow.

The Hollow family, recognizing the importance of preserving Marysville’s heritage, spearheaded another restoration project for the town’s Methodist Episcopal Church. This landmark, with its roots tracing back to 1886, has earned a well-deserved place on the National Register of Historic Places, solidifying its status as a cherished piece of the town’s history.

Originally erected by the devoted congregation on land purchased from the town’s founder, Thomas Cruse, in 1876, the church’s clapboard-sided frame and distinctive bell tower stand as testaments to the architectural and spiritual aspirations of the community during a period of heady growth. As you explore the Methodist Episcopal Church, you immerse yourself in the echoes of Marysville’s past, where faith, community, and resilience intertwine to create a lasting legacy.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#7

shaffer house

Formerly the residence of James and Donalda Shaffer, this historically significant building, generously donated by the Shaffer family in 1969, is currently undergoing an extensive restoration process with the noble aim of transforming it into a museum. The thoughtful gesture of the Shaffer family in parting with their cherished family home adds a layer of sentimental value to the ongoing restoration, as it honors the legacy of the original owners and contributes to the preservation of Marysville’s rich history.

A fascinating element of the surrounding landscape is the noticeable depression just south of the house, unveiling a hidden historical gem. This sunken area, a vestige of the past, once hosted the Northern Pacific Railroad turntable—a crucial site where train engines were deftly rotated to prepare for the return journey down the gulch. As you explore this location, you not only witness the meticulous efforts to restore the Shaffer family home but also engage with tangible remnants of Marysville’s railroad history, providing a captivating glimpse into the town’s bygone era.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#8

lush confectionary store

The wooden structure, which stood as a prominent feature until its unfortunate demolition in 2022, held a rich historical legacy as the former lush confectionary store. This establishment, now lost to time, was a nostalgic haven for locals and visitors alike, offering a delightful array of sweet treats and confections that created fond memories for generations.

As we reflect on the demolition of this wooden structure, it becomes a poignant reminder of the transient nature of historical landmarks, yet it also sparks a collective appreciation for the cultural significance and communal experiences woven into the fabric of Marysville’s past.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#9

j.a shaffer mercantile

Erected in the year 1885, this enduring rock-faced structure served as the home to the esteemed J.A. Shaffer Mercantile, a cornerstone of commerce and a vital hub for the community during its operational years. As a pivotal fixture in Marysville’s history, the J.A. Shaffer Mercantile not only provided essential goods and services but also stood witness to the evolving landscape of the town, reflecting the economic and social dynamics of that era.

Today, while the building might stand as a testament to the passage of time, its rock-faced façade echoes the resilience and endurance that characterized Marysville during a pivotal period in its development.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#10

masonic lodge

Established in 1898, the Marysville Masonic Lodge, recognized as Ottawa #51, has long been the esteemed occupant of this enduring brick structure, preserving its significant role in the town’s history. As a bastion of tradition and fraternity, the Masonic Lodge has not merely weathered the sands of time but continues to stand as a custodian of this historic edifice, contributing to its maintenance and ensuring its longevity as a vital part of Marysville’s architectural and cultural heritage.

This symbiotic relationship between the lodge and the structure not only underscores the lodge’s enduring commitment but also emphasizes the integral role such institutions play in safeguarding the town’s legacy for present and future generations.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#11

beckman’s meat market

Fondly referred to as “Kate’s Store,” this historical edifice bore witness to Marysville’s evolution, having initially functioned as Beckman’s Meat prior to the devastating fire of 1909. Following this calamity, Kate Sullivan, a stalwart entrepreneur, transformed the premises into a thriving grocery store, becoming an integral part of the community fabric until her passing in the late 1960s.

The unique history of “Kate’s Store” unfolds as a testament to the town’s resilience and reconstruction efforts after the destructive fire, showcasing it as one of the few business structures to emerge from the ashes in the post-1909 era. The legacy of Kate Sullivan and the evolution of this building not only reflect the adaptive spirit of Marysville but also encapsulate the stories of its inhabitants and their enduring contributions to the town’s narrative.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#12

nells lund saloon

Emerging from the ashes of the 1909 fire that reshaped Marysville’s landscape, this historic edifice came into existence, initially housing the Nels Lund Saloon. In the vibrant tapestry of Marysville’s history, this building underwent a fascinating metamorphosis during the 1940s when it transitioned into a bustling grocery store under the capable management of Ann and Ernie Korting.

The multifaceted narrative of this structure not only highlights its adaptive nature but also underscores the dynamic roles it played within the community over the years. From the convivial atmosphere of the Nels Lund Saloon to the essential services provided by the Korting-operated grocery store, the building serves as a tangible testament to Marysville’s ability to reinvent itself and cater to the evolving needs of its residents. Today, as we gaze upon this building, we are invited to contemplate the layers of history it encapsulates, each era leaving an indelible mark on the town’s ever-evolving story.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#13

drumlummon mine site

The illustrious history of the Drumlummon Mine spans from its discovery in 1876 by Thomas Cruise, who unearthed its gold-rich veins, to the early 1950s when tragedy struck with the destruction of the flotation mill due to fire. Throughout its operational years, this prolific mine yielded an astonishing value of over 50 million dollars in gold bullion, a testament to the wealth that lay hidden within its depths.

The expansive network of the Drumlummon Mine included over 20 miles of mine car rail, facilitating the transportation of precious ores. Within its core, a bustling workforce relied on the strength and labor of numerous working mules. Notably, the mine proudly featured two colossal stamp mills, towering structures that crushed and processed vast quantities of ore, contributing to the mine’s significant economic impact on the region.

The Drumlummon Mine swiftly ascended to prominence, earning recognition as one of the most crucial mining communities in Montana. Its storied past resonates not only in the tangible remnants of infrastructure but also in the echoes of the industrious spirit that characterized this mining enclave. As we reflect on the bygone era of the Drumlummon Mine, we acknowledge its enduring legacy as a symbol of Montana’s rich mining history and the resilience of those who contributed to its prosperity.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

#14

marysville cemetery


Situated approximately half a mile up Long Gulch Rd, the Marysville Cemetery stands as a poignant testament to the diverse stories that have shaped the town. Serving as the eternal resting place for a mosaic of individuals, including infants, soldiers, miners, and pioneers hailing from various walks of life, this sacred ground bears witness to the rich tapestry of Marysville’s history.

The cemetery’s origins trace back to 1883, marking its inception as the first burial ground for the Marysville community. Over the decades, it served as a silent witness to the ebb and flow of life, with the last burial occurring in 1978. While some headstones still endure, whispering tales of the past, the ravages of time, coupled with the unfortunate impact of vandals and the forces of nature, have taken their toll on many markers, rendering them lost to the ages.

As you traverse the grounds of the Marysville Cemetery, you are invited to reflect not only on the individual stories interred beneath the earth but also on the broader narrative of the town itself. This sacred space stands as a somber yet powerful reminder of the shared history that unites Marysville’s residents, past and present, creating a link between generations that transcends time.

marysvillemuseum83@gmail.com

Contact Us

Contact us today to book The Historic Marysville General Store for your upcoming event or to schedule a venue tour. We can’t wait to hear from you!